The Art of Networking

Kennedy Coopwood, contributing writer for Ed at Indiana, gives you tips on how to network!

Everyone networks. Whether you realize it or not, even you network. Anytime you refer your friend to a specific hairdresser, ask your friend to put in a good word for you with a job or someone of interest, or when you take down someone’s number for more information, you network. Networking is the easiest most effective tool for you in your life and carrier. Don’t “know how to network”? Ed at Indiana has got you covered.

When it comes to networking, the most important thing to remember is to always take down the name. Establishing a connection with someone is easy for us, editors-in-training, as we understand the importance of making a lasting impression. Once you meet and greet and exchange the smiles, never hesitate to get contact information.

Stay in touch with your connections. Example: If you frequently visit the hardware store and the staff starts to recognize you, make sure you recognize them in return. This way, the next time you come in, you have people ready to assist you. You may even get new info on deals, references to other customers who actually specialize in the area of repair you are looking for, or even better, discounts! If that doesn’t get you excited about networking, I don’t know what will.

The best thing about networking is you don’t know how much anyone could be of use until you actually use them. When it comes to the corporate world, it’s pretty black and white. An executive producer of a film would be great to provide insight on production, a photographer would be great to talk to if you have an interest in the photo industry and a magazine editor would be a great source for enterprise journalism and the magazine business. These types of titles are references, but when you’re talking to an editor and they mention they used to be a dancer and still keeps in contact with people on Broadway, now you have a double reference!

It’s all about communication and relationship. Don’t be afraid to build a reputation for yourself. Networking leads to career building and development, and while you strive to become the best editor you can be, always remember, networking is the key.

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US Weekly and Time Recap

Lindsay Moore, VP of Communications for Ed at Indiana, recapped last week’s Us Weekly and Time meeting. 

For Ed’s third Skype Hype this semester we were lucky enough to speak with two writers for weekly magazines. They gave us an inside look on how to land an interview, impress editors and be a standout intern.

We spoke with Us Weekly beauty writer, Rose Walano, about the differences between web and print and how to excel in both. Walano has worked at Elle.com, Glamour.com and Teenvogue.com and basically every other dream publication you can think of.

Cover Letters:

  1. Cover letters need to be tailored to the organization you’re applying for. Walano recommends being very familiar with the publication’s style and attitude so that you can mimic it in your cover letter.
  2. She also recommended adding some of your own personality. Cover letters are your first impression with editors—so make it sound like you!
  3. Absolutely no grammar or spelling mistakes! This sounds like a no brainer but submitting sloppy work puts you first on the chopping block.

Your work isn’t over once you land the internship. Walano gave us insider tips on what she did to stand out as an intern and what she notices about her own interns.

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Top 3 Writing Platforms for young journalists

Sierra Vandervort, contributing writer for Ed at Indiana, gives you a list of online writing platforms that you can write for.

As aspiring editors, we know how important experience is in this industry. People will fight tooth and nail for a good internship, and our resumes are constantly stacked with our latest pieces. But what we might not know is the sheer amount of different resume boosters right within your grasp.

Besides the IDS and INSIDE magazine, there are tons of online publications available for you to get your hands on. Send a resume and a quick hello to any (or all) of these top three platforms and you could be well on your way to a goldmine of experience.

1) Elite Daily:

As one of the top writing platforms for our generation, Elite Daily has been growing exponentially in popularity. With over 1.2 million followers, Elite Daily offers young journalists an audience bigger than our wildest dreams. They also make it super easy to work around a college kid’s schedule. As a contributing writer, you’re free to pitch and write articles at your convenience. Have a week full of exams? No problem, so you don’t publish for a couple weeks. Major dead week? Even better. You can submit three articles in a day. They’re not all guaranteed to get published, but if they do you can be sure your work will be seen by a lot of eyes, which is great for getting your name out there.

2) The Huffington Post:

Surprise! The Huffington Post has a blog. They invite young and experienced bloggers alike to join their team of esteemed wordsmiths. As one of the biggest names in publishing, working with HuffPo is a great way to further your career and get you noticed. Plus, you never who could be reading your work.

3) Thought Catalog:  

They’re the source of 50% of the articles you see on your Facebook feed, and they want writers like you. Thought Catalog is different in the sense that they don’t necessarily hire “contributing writers.” They take submissions from young writers and decide to publish based on content, opinion and relativity. That being said, many young writers have contributed dozens of articles in an attempt to get their name in ink. It’s a great first start if you’re more into feature ideas.

The bottom line is, don’t be afraid to put yourself out there. We’re at the point in our lives where, arguably, no press is bad press. Get your name on a byline. It doesn’t matter if it’s at TeenVogue.com or Auto Universe. You’re a writer – so write.

 

Embracing the Voice and Personality of a Magazine

Kennedy Coopwood, contributing writer for Ed at Indiana, gives you tips for how to find the voice and personality of a magazine. 

With so many magazines out there in the world, how do you fit right with just one? What can you do to set you in good standings with that particular magazine and brand? How will you stand out among others who have the same drive and who may even write or edit better than you do? The answer: Target your writing to a specific magazine.                                                                                                  Your cover letters, your sample writings for the magazine, even the way you present yourself should reflect that you are perfect for the job. Embrace the magazine as yours. Here’s how you can do that…

  • Do your research.

Find out what the magazine stands for. Figure out why the magazine was created and why people read it. The voice of the magazine is what keeps people reading. Study the style. Look at how articles are developed and printed. Sit down, take some time out of your day, and read.
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Q+A with Assistant to EIC at Seventeen Magazine

Ali Benveniste, VP of Ed Indiana, interviewed the assistant to  the  editor-in-chief at Seventeen Magazine. 
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Meaghan O’Connor
What inspired you to apply for the job at Seventeen?
First of all, I grew up with Seventeen! I felt like I knew the brand inside and out, and have wanted to intern/work here for as long as I could remember. Secondly, I have a ton of respect for my current boss—Editor-in-Chief, Ann Shoket—so when this opportunity came along, I knew I couldn’t pass it up. It was a combination of me knowing how FUN, CHALLENGING, and FAST-PACE the job would be! It just seemed like the perfect fit!
What does a typical day on the job look like for you?
That’s a tough question to answer, because no day is ever the same! I have multiple responsibilities, and I’m constantly rotating between all of them — it’s definitely a balancing act! First and foremost, I’m the Assistant to the Editor-in-Chief, Ann Shoket. That means keeping her organized, prepping for meetings, scheduling meetings, and keeping her on track and on schedule every day. If she gets behind, everyone else does too, so that’s a really important piece of my job. When I’m not doing that, I assist our features editors with story ideas, pitches, and big picture thinking. My interest and editorial focus is in health, food, and fitness, so that’s the story research I enjoy most. I also supervise our HUGE team of features interns every semester. I’m in charge of finding, hiring, and ensuring they have a positive work experience during their time here. And lastly, I interact with readers! Whether on social media, reading their emails, or talking to them through in-person focus groups, I ensure that our staff is constantly connected to our reader—because at the end of the day, they keep us in business! 🙂

Entry Level 101 Skype w/ Chandra Turner Recap

Kelsey Roadruck, contributing writer for Ed at Indiana, recapped the meeting we had last Tuesday evening with founder and president of Ed2010, Chandra Turner.

Although it’s a humbling thought to imagine yourself landing your dream job straight out college, it’s a tad – just a tad – unrealistic. Edsters hyperbolic visions were brought down to an attainable level this week as they Skyped with IU Journalism alumna and founder of Ed2010, Chandra Turner. Turner tuned us all into what entry-level editor positions are really like, and how whippersnappers can get there.

“We all wanted to be editors by 2010,” so Ed2010 was born, folks. Straight off the graduation stage, Turner fled the Midwest and headed to New York where she began interning for “American Baby” as part of the ASME program. Her fellow ASME interns were just shy of age from Turner, so when they returned to school in the fall, Turner remained their core contact that was still based in NYC. After graduation in ‘98, the ASME clan reunited with a six-pack and departed once more with a buzz and a website – Ed2010.

Finding Internships and Jobs:
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A Day in the Life of Teen Vogue Intern

Carmen Huff, Ed’s President, interviewed a former Teen Vogue intern.  Here’s the inside scoop!

teenvogue

Denali Free is a senior at Savannah College of Art & Design studying advertising. Two summers ago – when Condé still had their intern program – she was an intern for Teen Vogue. She had a blast and returned as a freelance designer last summer. Here is what a typical day looked like:

8:15 a.m. Head out the doors of my apartment and jump on the subway. My commute started in Brooklyn Heights and ended 7 stops away at the infamous Condé Nast building in Times Square.

8:45 a.m. Join the rush of people getting off the subway at 42nd Street, dodge tourists and the ever growing group of Elmo’s, Mickey’s and Minions to finally make it to the front doors of the 4 Times Square. Walk through security and take the elevator to the Teen Vogue offices while subtly checking out (and being completely envious) all the amazing outfits everyone is wearing.

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