Top 3 Writing Platforms for young journalists

Sierra Vandervort, contributing writer for Ed at Indiana, gives you a list of online writing platforms that you can write for.

As aspiring editors, we know how important experience is in this industry. People will fight tooth and nail for a good internship, and our resumes are constantly stacked with our latest pieces. But what we might not know is the sheer amount of different resume boosters right within your grasp.

Besides the IDS and INSIDE magazine, there are tons of online publications available for you to get your hands on. Send a resume and a quick hello to any (or all) of these top three platforms and you could be well on your way to a goldmine of experience.

1) Elite Daily:

As one of the top writing platforms for our generation, Elite Daily has been growing exponentially in popularity. With over 1.2 million followers, Elite Daily offers young journalists an audience bigger than our wildest dreams. They also make it super easy to work around a college kid’s schedule. As a contributing writer, you’re free to pitch and write articles at your convenience. Have a week full of exams? No problem, so you don’t publish for a couple weeks. Major dead week? Even better. You can submit three articles in a day. They’re not all guaranteed to get published, but if they do you can be sure your work will be seen by a lot of eyes, which is great for getting your name out there.

2) The Huffington Post:

Surprise! The Huffington Post has a blog. They invite young and experienced bloggers alike to join their team of esteemed wordsmiths. As one of the biggest names in publishing, working with HuffPo is a great way to further your career and get you noticed. Plus, you never who could be reading your work.

3) Thought Catalog:  

They’re the source of 50% of the articles you see on your Facebook feed, and they want writers like you. Thought Catalog is different in the sense that they don’t necessarily hire “contributing writers.” They take submissions from young writers and decide to publish based on content, opinion and relativity. That being said, many young writers have contributed dozens of articles in an attempt to get their name in ink. It’s a great first start if you’re more into feature ideas.

The bottom line is, don’t be afraid to put yourself out there. We’re at the point in our lives where, arguably, no press is bad press. Get your name on a byline. It doesn’t matter if it’s at TeenVogue.com or Auto Universe. You’re a writer – so write.

 

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